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2019 Awards Finalists

Gradam Margaíochta le Gaeilge

Comhar Chreidmheasa Chorca Dhuibhne
Ruth Uí Ógáin
Brian de Staic
Brian de Staic
Cumann Lúthchleas Gael
Jamie Ó Tuama
Energia
Amy O'Shaughnessy
XL
Jenny Egan

Sponsored by

Comhar Chreidmheasa Chorca Dhuibhne

Ruth Uí Ógáin

Comhar Chreidmheasa Chorca Dhuibhne is a Gaeltacht-based Credit Union with over 4,500 members, and a firm mission to serve them in their own language. A survey of members found over two-thirds regarding service in Irish as being important. Irish is a vital element in the marketing strategy as it reinforces its uniqueness, empathy, and local community roots. The comprehensive language plan incorporates marketing, communications and PR. A bilingual app gives members access to their accounts in Irish on their mobiles – the first financial institution in Ireland to provide this. Internet banking is also offered bilingually. This credit union’s embrace of Irish serves as an example for many other service providers.
Winner
Brian de Staic

Brian de Staic

Brian de Staic, Seodóir an Daingin, has been creating distinctive celtic and contemporary jewellery for forty years. Ireland’s leading goldsmith is far from any High Street, but is based in the Gaeltacht of Corca Dhuibhne, closer to the native Irish heritage that his life’s work embraces, distributing online and through retail outlets. Only Irish Hallmarked silver and gold is used for original pieces, continuing timeless traditions of Irish jewellery crafting. The Irish language has from the start been integral to the brand, and it is visible not just in its name, logo, fonts and communications, but it lives at the very heart of the business. Tá a lán seodra luachmhara i siopaí Bhrian de Staic ach ‘sí an tseoid is luachmhaire ná an Gaolainn.
Finalist
Cumann Lúthchleas Gael

Jamie Ó Tuama

Cumann Lúthchleas Gael is Ireland’s largest sporting organisation, and it is celebrated as one of the great amateur sporting associations in the world. It is part of the Irish consciousness and plays an influential role in Irish society that extends far beyond the basic aim of promoting Gaelic games. ‘Buail Buille don Ghaeilge’ is an Irish language marketing campaign implemented by the association as part of Bliain na Gaeilge, aimed at encouraging members and fans to speak whatever Irish they have at games and other social events. Lá na Gaeilge featured in Croke Park before 70,000 people at the All Ireland Hurling Semi-final. Four videos with players from all four provinces speaking Irish ‘took a shot for Irish’ or ‘a bhuail buille don Ghaeilge’.
Finalist
Energia

Amy O'Shaughnessy

In spite of Energia’s history of investment in the Irish energy market, it has always been challenged in building brand awareness and affinity in its category. Whilst significant strides have been made since launch, its competitors dominate in terms of trust, consideration and loyalty, and Energia struggles to associate with ‘Irishness’. A partnership with Conradh na Gaeilge as title sponsor of ‘Seachtain na Gaeilge le Energia’ provided the platform for a high-profile, high reach national campaign. Energia expanded its suite of customer material ‘as Gaeilge’ and engaged staff through an internal comms plan. All objectives were achieved, and the sponsorship gained a healthy spontaneous awareness and significant uplifts in brand metrics.
Finalist
XL

Jenny Egan

The XL brand sought a new and innovative way to raise brand awareness, and it entered into a partnership with TG4 around a sponsorship to open an XL store on the set of Ireland’s only Irish language soap, Ros na Rún. A newly branded XL local ‘siopa’ was introduced to the streetscape. The XL store is now at the heart of the action, a hub where characters meet daily to gossip, clash and make peace. This partnership is ideal for BWG Foods, the owners of the XL brand, as the business takes pride in serving local communities. XL gained a TV presence on a historical flagship Irish soap, without having an ‘above the line’ budget and the XL brand is developing its association with the Irish language as a result.
Finalist